Monthly Archives: September 2013

Orleans Guard Battalion

Another 90 day regiment in Pond’s brigade at Shiloh.

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Photography is a wonderful thing.  I need better light.  The interesting bit about this picture is that the blue is much lighter than it appears on the figure.  I haven’t noticed a lot of color shift before, but this is noticable.  On the figures, in the room, you can tell they are blue, but they really look close to black.

I’m not sure about the uniforms.  They wore blue with red facings but I don’t know if they should be in frock coats, or shell jackets.  I depicted them in frock coats, thinking that might be a safer bet.

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Iain at Flags of War came through with a flag for these guys.  I contacted the Confederate Museum in New Orleans and they described the flag these guys carried.  I had read they had it on display last year for the 150th of Shiloh.  The original is small (36×42 I think) but I like the look of oversized flags so this fits perfectly.  On my other blog (http://battleoframillies.wordpress.com) I’d mentioned that Iain is doing a range of flags for Dutch in the War of Spanish Succession (woot!).  When talking to him about that, I asked if he could do a flag for these guys and he did!  You can now order it from his website (http://www.flagsofwar.com/).  It’s a very nice flag!

I’ve had the figs painted for awhile and now it’s nice to have them with their proper flag.

 

Crescent Regiment

One of the two big (7 stand) regiments in Pond’s brigade.  The Crescent Regiment was a 90 day regiment.   I guess 7 stand regiments are impressive looking.

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They entered the Battle of Shiloh with 700 men.  Two uniforms survive from the battle, although their owners did not.  One is a gray frock coat with yellow piping on the sleeves, collar, and down the front of the coat.  Light blue trousers with a yellow pipe down the outer seem.  The other is a commutation shell jacket, dark gray, with no adornments.  I’ve depicted the unit in a mix of these two uniforms.

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The other 7 stand regiment in the brigade is 38th Tennessee.  They are on the painting table now.  But next up will be the Orleans Guard Battalion.  I’ve had the figures painted for awhile but now I’m very pleased to have the flag of that battalion courtesy of Iain at Flags of War.  Hopefully I’ll have pictures up of that in a couple of days. 

Figures by Redoubt with some Steve Barber heads mixed in.

Artillery limber

My friend Joe painted this for me.  Nicely done as usual.

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One of the guys in the group came up with the idea of building 4 horse limber stands with an optional 2 horse base for the front.  The number of horses on the limber stand will correspond to the number of guns in the battery.  A nice idea.

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George of George bases made the bases from mdf and left a small square slot on each end of the base so that we could glue magnets in and the front and back will stick together for the most part.  The paint hides them but they still work well.

 

Carolingian Hearthguard

This is the beginning of a Carolingian force for SAGA.

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I’ve had my eye on these figures by Artizan for a long time.  Until now, I couldn’t find any good reason to buy them.  I imagined they would be kind of big and not look too good on FoG standard bases, and I wasn’t sure the army would be that interesting in FoG anyway.  But now with SAGA skirmish, I can put them on a decent sized base (these are 1″x2″), they won’t be crowded, and the Franks are an interesting faction in SAGA.

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The figures are beautiful but not without issue.  The riders are awesome, but the horses are a little weak in the legs.  Not sure why, but perhaps it’s a change in materials that are being used for the casting.  I’m not sure it shows up in these photos, but at least a couple of the horses in this batch (I have 3 more on their painting bottles) have legs bent in odd ways underneath the horse.  It wasn’t clear to me how to bend them back, but at least one of them got that way when I was cleaning up the casting as I felt it bend.

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The riders are awesome though and there is a lot of variety in what is offered.

This is my first attempt to photograph against a white background and it didn’t work so well, actually.  Need to figure out how to do that better.

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5th Company, Washington Artillery

Newly arrived in camp, the 5th Company, Washington Artillery.  This battery was assigned to Anderson’s brigade at Shiloh and was equipped with a pair of 6lb “James” rifles, a pair of 6lb smoothbores, and a pair of howitzers.

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They entered the battle at Shiloh still wearing their blue coats.  I don’t know how many times I’ve read of units going into battle there in blue coats and then reversing them so the gray lining was showing in order not to be confused with Union soldiers.  I’m pretty skeptical about all of these.  But in this particular instance, I believe it, because I found a unit history where the author has been in the memoirs of men in the unit and is quoting a specific memoir and naming the officer who ordered the switch, after the battle had already started.

Still, they are beautiful in their blue with their red kepis:

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Now if someone made figures of artillerists changing their coats around, I’d have to paint them.  I wonder what an inside out shell jacket would look like?

 

Chain of Command second playtest

With pictures this time!  Here is from the point of view of the Soviet entry side looking down the length of the board:

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In the above picture everything is on the board and in action, so we were pretty far into the game by this time.

We played an early war Germans vs Soviets so that is some village somewhere in the Ukraine perhaps.  It was the first game for my friend so we just went with a patrol scenario and fairly generic troop setups rather than going through all the steps.  We each started with a fairly generic but understrength platoon using the published early war army lists.

The Lard Island blog (http://toofatlardies.co.uk/blog/) has published lists for German in 1939 for the invasion of Poland and the Soviets for 1939-1940 for the Winter War.  I just used those.  Those are some big platoons with big squads!

I have the info to produce lists for Barbarossa in 1941 and Stalingrad in 1942 but haven’t actually done that yet, so we just used the published lists.  I didn’t quite have enough figures for the published earlier lists, so each side had smaller than specified squads.

Here’s a picture of the Soviet left flank where a single squad is faced off against a full German squad and an additional rifle team that is being brought up under the cover of the hill:

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We did the pregame patrol phase and jump off set up.  The Soviets were able to get too jump off markers in houses in the village and the third here behind this hill.  The Germans’ jump off markers were spread out on their side in wheatfields and behind the smaller hill on their left.  In the game the Soviets deployed only one squad here on the left and it seems hard pressed against the German squad and a half.

But not to worry, what do you do if you’re Soviet?  You charge with the bayonet!

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I’m not sure we had a close combat in the first game so I wanted to see how it worked.  It wasn’t the best idea for the Soviets to charge.  They definitely got the worst of it, but they didn’t break.  Still, the After pic for them wasn’t good:

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6 guys down, wounded leader, and one shock away from being pinned.  The German charged in to finish them off but was surprisingly repulsed!  Not much left of either squad after that.

On the right the Soviets had the advantage of numbers.  3 full squads vs 1.5 squads of Germans.  This, however is what happens to a squad when it advances in front of an MG34:

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The buys in the immediate foreground are from a separate squad, but the guys in the ruined building across the road and the guys hiding behind the building are part of the same squad.  Before the MG34 opened up on them, there were a bunch more guys in the road, now casualties.

But the Soviet numbers told against the MG team as it took hits from advancing Soviets, became pinned, and then broke from the mounting Soviet rifle fire:

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Comrade Stalin taught us that quantity has a quality of its own.  The Soviet numbers also told on the right where the advancing squad’s fire began to overwhelm the remaining German full squad.  (Well, this was just sheer luck, the Soviets only took 2 shock from a 9 hit shot from the Germans):

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Great game.  I can’t wait for the next time I play.