Monthly Archives: May 2014

Dusty Panzer III

I’m working on some German vehicles for 1942 approaching and within the fighting at Stalingrad.  So they will mostly be panzer gray, but dusted up from the trek across country and into the urban fighting.  Here’s my first attempt, a Warlord Panzer IIIJ.

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I’m not that keen on the model although it came out okay after the weathering.  Since I didn’t like it that much I didn’t bother with unit insignia and I wish I had put that on now.

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I’ve been reading and tring to absorb as much as I can about weathering vehicles and trying things out.  This has four weathering techniques applied.  Before I painted it I stuck some texture on places where I thought there might be built up mud from the road.  This technique is a keeper and I plan to use it on all vehicles I do from now on.   After painting (I used the Lifecolor panzer gray saturation set) I applied some oil washes to bring out details.  This seems like a natural part of doing vehicles these days.  After the rest of this kind of weathering (adding dust) I’m not sure about that step.  The third technique I used was enamels for dust.  I mixed up a couple of humbrol enamels, blew those on with the airbrush, and then brushed some of it off.  That created a nice depth of worn on grime but didn’t give me enough dust effects.  I’ll try skipping this on the next one.  Last was using a bunch of AK interactive enamel effect washes.  These things are magic.  I use them for figures too.  I think I used them a bit too much on this vehicle, but overall, I’m pleased with the result.

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That’s an awful pic (I can’t figure out how changing the camera angle seems to change how the thing looks so much) but it does show how much dust I put on the horizontal surfaces.  While I’m sure there would be a lot, I don’t think I’ve got a believable result on that.  Have some ideas about how to do that differently for the next vehicle.

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I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a pack hanging from the back of the turret stowage trunk, but I needed to hide an error in applying the turret number, so there it is.

I’ll probably sell this when I’m done with another couple of these and have done some comparison shots.  Let me know if you might be interested.

And here’s a version to link to for the Steve Dean forum:

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Urban ruin test piece

These are really nice!  I’ve been looking forward to getting my hands on the Commission Figurines 28mm ruins for a long time.  I finally got one this week and wasted no time doing some work on a test piece.

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I’m not entirely finished with it, but it’s off to a great start.  I took inspiration from 14th Brooklyn on making the interior into something believable.  I copied his lead by printing out some dollhouse floor patterns and glueing them to the base.  I used a different pattern for each of the two different rooms in the building.    I attempted painting some pattern on the wall.  While this is fine, it was a mistake.

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Blue and yellow vertical stripes in the bottom picture.  It looks even worse in real life.  If I were going to do that I should mask the lines and use an airbrush to get a nice finish, then go back and paint the brick sections.  Next time, I’ll just wallpaper over them with some dollhouse wallpaper patterns.  The floors look nice though, don’t you think?

These buildings are really nice.   The fit is tight.  It’s so tight in fact that I couldn’t get the walls quite down into their slots without carving out the slots a bit, and still there was a bit of a gap.  It was only on this section though – all the others seem to go together better.

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I intend to finish them a little more.  I’d like to add some rubble but I’m hesitating a bit about that as I don’t want to reduce the playability of the models too much.  There is some portable rubble that I can add to really rubble them up as should be.  I’m leaning to adding minimal rubble around the wall joins and in a couple of random places and using the portable rubble which we can remove during play.

My main concern with these buildings was whether I could hide the joins.  You can see the joins pretty clearly in the big picture of everything you get in this ruined building:

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If I can’t hide that, using these is a non-starter.  On my test piece there are only three joins, two horizontal and one vertical.  You can see in the pictures that those joins are completely covered.  I’m not sure the horizontal joins have the best strategic placement for hiding them but I guess it’s ok.  But, good news, with a little wood putty, sanding, and painting you can’t see them at all.  I’ll do a corner piece next to confirm that, but it should be no problem.

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I added a little more wood filler at random places to the front, sanded, then painted over, to give the surface some texture.  I think they look great.  The pictures are pretty awful – I really have to figure out how to take pictures that look like what I’m aiming at.

 

Chain of Command US Rifle Platoon

Just a quick blurb to show the whole platoon together.

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They were shot up pretty badly by German machine guns in their first outing.  They have some cool characteristics though.  The automatic rifles get to reroll “1”s which is kind of like having a couple of extra dice when a platoon is firing.  And they can move and shoot better than most trips with some leader initiative.  I’m looking forward to using them more.

 

Polish 10th Dragoons Test figure

A Crusader figure.  Testing it out for doing a platoon from the Polish 10th Dragoons for Falaise.

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This is an awesome figure.  I can easily seeing painting a platoon of these guys.  I liked the Crusader American figures but this figure seems to be a bit of a step up.  All the details and the sculpting is just a little better.  I can see in the 2nd photo above that I have a little sealant haze I’m going to have to clean up.  Argh.

 

 

Here’s a couple of eye level pics.

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